Eric Stanton

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Eric Stanton

#1 Beitragvon Guest » 13. Juni 2004, 23:55

ERIC STANTON (1926-1999)

"The Rembrandt of Pulp-Culture"
Eric Stanton is the grand master of fetish art.

He began drawing for the famous New York publisher Irving Klaw (discoverer of Betty Page) in 1947, and continued to work for him until Klaw’s death in 1964. "I draw better than most of your artists," Eric Stanton told Irving Klaw by way of introduction. That meeting marked the start of a dazzling career for the man who now ranks beside John Willie as one of the masters of erotic art.

Stanton met Steve Ditko, the creator of Spiderman, in 1951 at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, and they shared an art studio from 1958 until 1966. It is said that the spiderweb idea of the famous superhero came from Stanton, who was drawing bondage and fetish imagery for Klaw’s magazines while Ditko published with Marvel Comics. Often Stanton did the drawings in ink and Ditko coloured them in. Eric Stanton also made a name for himself designing covers for men's magazines.

His imaginative, detailed drawings picture "perfect female specimens – big breasted, small waisted, long legs in high heels, strong jaw line, high cheekbones, fiery eyes and cascading hair" (Eric Kroll). They were amazon descendants, femme fatales, mistresses of the whip or the handcuffs; simultaneously a parody and a sincere celebration of empowered sexuality.

"A nude body is nothing," he told Kroll, who edited a landmark book of his work entitled The Art of Eric Stanton (Taschen). "I like a woman in boots and corsets. I don’t like see-thru outfits but lace I love. And I love pleated skirts. They make her more femine. She can’t be small. A woman has to be strong. The bigger the better. I like good firmness but I don’t like muscle girls. A light build-up is good."

The men in his fast-moving narratives are often trying to escape but they are always immobilized, restrained by ropes, or simply frozen in their awe at the sight of Stanton's superheroines. "I always like the dominance of the female. Men are ugly. Who wants to see a man?", he told Kroll.

His great muse was his second wife, Britt, who now runs The Stanton Archives, a collection of graphic booklets, movies and photo sets that contain more than forty years of his art. "She was my Betty Page," Stanton told Kroll. "On his second date with Britt, Stanton asked her to tie him up. He was making a 8mm film for a customer who requested a man tied up." In 1969, he says in Kroll’s foreword to The Art of Eric Stanton, "the super of my building was a young fellow married to a Hungarian girl. At this time Britt was 22 and the super’s wife was 20. We made black and white photo sets of the two of them wrestling and offered them through my mail order business. The super knew about photography and he developed the pictures in our bathroom. We paid the models $20 for a 50 foot film."

Among his comic series of this time are The Princkazon, The Hairy Princesses, Blunder Broad, and his legendary Fighting Girls. The Return of Gwendoline was Stanton’s 1966 tribute to John Willie.

In the 1980’s Eric Stanton started publishing his Stantoons, a series of small booklets, several of which are available through the gallery. In 1985 the magazine Leg Show published The Fantasy World of Eric Stanton, which contained his series Sweeter Gwen, Fighting Juanita, Muscle Girls and Bonnie and Clara.

In 1984 he had the only exhibition of his career, an important and rare show of his art at the Danceteria club in New York City. He died in 1999.


Quelle : http://www.wildseduction.com/featuredartists/artandlust/Eric_Stanton.html
Zuletzt geändert von Guest am 14. Juni 2004, 00:14, insgesamt 1-mal geändert.

Guest

Re: Eric Stanton

#2 Beitragvon Guest » 14. Juni 2004, 00:06

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Re: Eric Stanton

#3 Beitragvon Guest » 14. Juni 2004, 00:21

"THE MASTER"

Can common places, just as maxims, be considered folk wisdom? I hope so, because I am going to spend one of them to introduce you to Eric Stanton, legendary angel of the bizarre. It sounds like this: "If Stanton didn't exist he should be invented". Actually, for a long time, it seemed to be true - in other words that it could just be a nom de plume adopted by a group of artists determined to remain anonymous. More recently this seemed to be the case with other prolific authors of best-sellers, namely Harold Robbins and Wilbur Smith, at least until the two decided to give interviews and to show themselves in public to prove their own existence. Stanton, reserved as he is, has never submitted to such chores with the only exceptions of an exhibition (it still remains unique throughout his career!) at the Danceteria in New York, and some rare interviews. One of these was given to yours truly in 1979, so I can testify to the fact that Eric Stanton exists, is alive and well, and working, if not with us, at least for us. Rumors of his presumed non-existence were based upon his long-lasting activity, covering a period of more than 40 years, and upon his ability to treat with the same confidence all those themes which are commonly labeled "bizarre" Since then, I have met with him at least twice every year and, even though some of his mysteries remain, others have been unveiled, so that I am now working on his biography. It will be the first to be published. Stanton was born on the 30th of September 1926, in Brooklyn, New York, between Atlantic Avenue and Pacific (on the sea as he jokingly says), to a family of Russian origins but with unexpected Italian blood in its' veins (his father's surname was D'Andrea). He was forced to interrupt his studies, during the Second World War, to become a radio operator on a torpedo boat in the Pacific war against Japan. When he came back home he tried various jobs (a well established cliché in every American biography!) - Knife-thrower, waiter, and grave-digger to name but a few - until he finally met Irving Klaw, the 'King of Pin-ups'. He began to work for him, and the collaboration continued until Klaw's death in 1964. Stanton is a self-made man - he only took his first formal drawing lessons in 1952 when he was already working full-time. Actually it was Klaw who convinced him to attend the School of Visual Arts. Stanton repaid him by polishing his style, and by later introducing Klaw to another great, the late Gene Bilbrew, a.k.a. 'Eneg'. After Klaw's death, Stanton became a freelance who only occasionally worked for other publishers, preferring instead to create 'The Stanton Archives', a collection of graphic booklets, photocopies, movies and photo sets that represent the production of more than forty years of artistic activity. This is how he makes his living now - a sort of underground network distributed by mail to his many fans. It works like this: He has some rich buyers, what are traditionally known as patrons, and they place orders for various subjects. (This is how three of Stanton's best sellers were born; 'The Princkazons', 'The Hairy Princesses' and his legendary 'Fighting Girls') When the story is ready what the buyer pays for is not just the right to have it before it is published, but also to keep the original drawings for him-self for many years. What Stanton keeps for him-self are the copies, the same the regular buyers get, and the right to reproduce and distribute them. These photocopies are the only way to get some of his stories, true rarities, sometimes, that will never be widely published. This is how Blunder Broad was born: to satisfy the explicit request of a wealthy and unknown buyer with a penchant for Damsels in Distress. The customer wanted a story about a superheroine who, unlike the other superheroines, "blundered" her way to a "sex"cessful conclusion of her mission. Eric delivered. Neither Stanton nor his writer Turk Winter, who, by the way, is a well-known author of popular novels, are psychologists but their collaboration is a long-lasting one. What was originally intended as nothing more than a divertissement has become a serious commitment in which different themes are presented without discriminations. "Bisexuality? Masochism? Sadism? Bondage? Pissing? Name whatever you like, I have done it. Because they are all important to my readers." he says. Surprise!! The heterosexual Stanton has done several homosexual stories, too. Nowadays, this 'Dallas' of fetishism has reached its' 38th chapter and its' author is working on a new episode: Blunder Broad in Wonderland. Well, now you probably understand why, after being inspired by John Willie, Stanton is considered a master in his own right as well as a source of inspiration for Allen Jones, among others, and also why some of his patrons once compared him (There is a letter to prove this!) to Toulouse Lautrec, who was able to understand and paint the world of prostitution; or to Vincent Van Gogh who struggled all his life with critics' hostility and his financial problems. Long life to Blunder Broad, the heroine who is now celebrating her twentieth birthday of printed adventures and is now making her debut in this elite comic. And let us pay homage to Eric Stanton who "…if he didn't exist, should be invented…"

Reprinted from Glittering Images' 1991 Publication "Blunder Broad - A Comix Serial" Author, Introduction: Marco Giovannini. (Edited for content at the request of 'Stanton Archives')

quelle : http://www.mutoworld.com/Stanton.htm

Guest

Re: Eric Stanton

#4 Beitragvon Guest » 14. Juni 2004, 00:34

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